Bento 0.0.4 released !

I have just released the new version of Bento, 0.0.4. You can get it on github as usual

 

Bento itself did not change too much, except for the support of sub-packages and a few things. But now bento can build both numpy and scipy on the “easy” platforms (linux + Atlas + gcc/clang). This posts shows a few cool things that you can do now with bento

Full distribution check

The best way to use this version of bento is to do the following:

# Download bento and create bentomaker
git clone http://github.com/cournape/Bento.git bento-git
cd bento-git && python bootstrap.py && cd ..
# Download the _bento_build branch from numpy
git clone http://github.com/cournape/numpy.git numpy-git
cd numpy-git && git checkout -b bento_build origin/_bento_build
# Create a source tarball from numpy, configure, build and test numpy
# from that tarball
../bento-git/bentomaker distcheck

For some reasons I am still unclear about, the test suite fails to run from distcheck for scipy, but that seems to be more of a nose issue than bento proper.

Building numpy with clang

Assuming you are on Linux, you can try to build numpy with clang, the LLVM-based C compiler. Clang is faster at compiling than gcc, and generally gives better error messages than gcc. Although bento itself does not have any support for clang yet, you can easily play with the bento scripts to do so. In the top bscript file from numpy, at the end of the post_configure hook, replace every compiler with clang, i.e.:

for flag in ["CC", "PYEXT_CC"]:
     yctx.env[flag] = ["clang"]

Once the project is configured, you can also get a detailed look at the configured options, in the file build/default.env.py. You should not modify this file, but it is very useful to debug build issues. Another aid for debugging configuration options is the build/config.log file. Not only does it list every configuration command (both success and failures), but it also shows the source content as well as the command output.

What’s coming next ?

Version 0.0.5 will hopefully have a shorter release period than 0.0.4. The goal for 0.0.5 is to make bento good enough so that other people can jump in bento development.

The main features I am thinking about are windows and python 3 support + a lot of code cleaning/documentation. Windows should not be too difficult, it is mainly about ripping off numscons/scons code for Visual studio support and adapt it into yaku. I have already started working on python 3 support as well – the main issue is bootstrapping bento, and finding an efficient process to work on both python 2 and 3 at the same time. Depending on the difficulty, I will also try to add proper dependency handling in yaku for compiled libraries and dependent headers: ATM, yaku does not detect header change, nor does it rebuild an extension if the linked libraries changed. An alternative is to bite the bullet and start working on integration with waf, which already does all this internally.

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